Sunday, December 11, 2016

Absent friends Bob Dylan och Patti Smith


Två tal och en gripande sång

Från Stockholms Konserthus, Nobelprisutdelning, Patti Smith framför en av Bob Dylans mästerliga sånger A Hard Rain´s A Gonna Fall från Dylans genombrottsalbum The Freewheelin.
Ett mycket gripande framförande av Patti Smith.
Patti som kom av sig under högtidsstundens allvar bland kungligheter och dignitärer plus en hel del svenska musiker, singer/songwriters, med Dylananknytning, som var inbjudna.
 A Hard Rain´s A Gonna Fall är skriven som en som en poetisk protest - en lyrisk krönika i fem verser under Cuba-krisen 1962. Bakom de mörka frågorna finns rädslan för ett kärnvapenkrig. En rädsla en hel amerikansk generation ungdomar vuxit upp med.
 I dag känns sången som aktuell med tanke på Den globala uppvärmningen och risken för olyckor med kärnkraftverk som den i Fukishima i Japan. Faktiskt har Bob Dylan uppträtt i Japan med en symfoniorkester och sjungit och spelat just A Hard Rain´s A Gonna Fall. Starka verser och starka refränger.
 Oh what did you see, my blueeyded son?/Oh what did you see my darling young one?
Innan har Horace Engdahl hållt ett lysande tal över Bob Dylans sånger och texter (Songbook) som indirekt berättar vad Bob Dylan gjorde i Hibbing under pojkåren (enligt Bob Dylans mamma satt Bob i tolv år i rummet på övervåningen i deras hus på nuvarande adressen Bob Dylan Drive och väntade på att bli författare).
Sällan har Horace Engdahl hållt ett så klart, enkelt och upplysande tal över en pristagare, Kistalight citerar några rader.
 Men det Bob Dylan gjorde var inte att återvända till grekerna eller provensalerna. I stället försvor han sig med kropp och själ åt 1900-talets amerikanska populärmusik, det som spelades på radiostationer och grammofonskivor för vanligt folk, vita och svarta: kampsånger, country, blues, tidig rock, gospel, underhållningsmusik. (Horace Engdahl)

I stadshuset efter banketten framför den amerikanska ambassadören Azita Raji Bob Dylans tacktal. Ett tal som fångar publiken. Enkelt, konkret även här, med detaljer som får lyssnaren att haja till och också med en resonerande hållning.
Vad är litteratur?
Bob Dylan alluderar Shakespeare.
Kaxigt - javisst!
I began to think about William Shakespeare, the great literary figure. I would reckon he thought of himself as a dramatist. The thought that he was writing literature couldn't have entered his head. His words were written for the stage. Meant to be spoken not read. When he was writing Hamlet, I'm sure he was thinking about a lot of different things: "Who're the right actors for these roles?" "How should this be staged?" "Do I really want to set this in Denmark?" His creative vision and ambitions were no doubt at the forefront of his mind, but there were also more mundane matters to consider and deal with. "Is the financing in place?" "Are there enough good seats for my patrons?" "Where am I going to get a human skull?" I would bet that the farthest thing from Shakespeare's mind was the question "Is this literature?"

Ett tal som också väcker en viss munterhet kring detaljerna (Denmark and human skull) och vi tycker oss ana att det här var ett tacktal utöver det vanliga (outside the box) med ett mycket lyssnande auditorium.
Möjligen var Bob Dylan kvällens och eftermiddagens mest närvarande gäst om än frånvarande tror Kistalight med tår i ögonvrån och tänker på två lysande tal och en gripande sång.
Tur säger fru Mimmi i TV-soffan.
Att Bob inte var där.
Lugnast så!

Lust att läsa mer om Bob Dylan, skrivande och kreativitet?
Läs Kistalights essä om Chronicles!
Finns nu även på Smashword.
Bara ladda ner Grabbar och Tjejer!
For Free åtminstone till vidare!


© Thommy Sjöberg

Labels: , ,

5 Comments:

Anonymous Bob Dylan Noble Speech said...

Bob Dylans Noble Speech: Part 1
It was short, grateful, and focused on the question of “What is Literature?”

Good evening, everyone. I extend my warmest greetings to the members of the Swedish Academy and to all of the other distinguished guests in attendance tonight.
I’m sorry I can’t be with you in person, but please know that I am most definitely with you in spirit and honored to be receiving such a prestigious prize. Being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature is something I never could have imagined or seen coming. From an early age, I’ve been familiar with and reading and absorbing the works of those who were deemed worthy of such a distinction: Kipling, Shaw, Thomas Mann, Pearl Buck, Albert Camus, Hemingway.
These giants of literature whose works are taught in the schoolroom, housed in libraries around the world and spoken of in reverent tones have always made a deep impression. That I now join the names on such a list is truly beyond words.
I don’t know if these men and women ever thought of the Nobel honor for themselves, but I suppose that anyone writing a book, or a poem, or a play anywhere in the world might harbor that secret dream deep down inside. It’s probably buried so deep that they don’t even know it’s there.
If someone had ever told me that I had the slightest chance of winning the Nobel Prize, I would have to think that I’d have about the same odds as standing on the moon. In fact, during the year I was born and for a few years after, there wasn’t anyone in the world who was considered good enough to win this Nobel Prize. So, I recognize that I am in very rare company, to say the least.
/ _ _ _ /
Bob Dylan

1:41 AM  
Anonymous Bob Dylan Noble Speech part 2 said...

Bob Dylans Noble Speech part 2
I was out on the road when I received this surprising news, and it took me more than a few minutes to properly process it. I began to think about William Shakespeare, the great literary figure. I would reckon he thought of himself as a dramatist. The thought that he was writing literature couldn’t have entered his head. His words were written for the stage. Meant to be spoken not read. When he was writing Hamlet, I’m sure he was thinking about a lot of different things: “Who’re the right actors for these roles?” “How should this be staged?” “Do I really want to set this in Denmark?” His creative vision and ambitions were no doubt at the forefront of his mind, but there were also more mundane matters to consider and deal with. “Is the financing in place?” “Are there enough good seats for my patrons?” “Where am I going to get a human skull?” I would bet that the farthest thing from Shakespeare’s mind was the question “Is this literature?”
When I started writing songs as a teenager, and even as I started to achieve some renown for my abilities, my aspirations for these songs only went so far. I thought they could be heard in coffee houses or bars, maybe later in places like Carnegie Hall, the London Palladium. If I was really dreaming big, maybe I could imagine getting to make a record and then hearing my songs on the radio. That was really the big prize in my mind. Making records and hearing your songs on the radio meant that you were reaching a big audience and that you might get to keep doing what you had set out to do.
Well, I’ve been doing what I set out to do for a long time, now. I’ve made dozens of records and played thousands of concerts all around the world. But it’s my songs that are at the vital center of almost everything I do. They seemed to have found a place in the lives of many people throughout many different cultures and I’m grateful for that.
But there’s one thing I must say. As a performer I’ve played for 50,000 people and I’ve played for 50 people and I can tell you that it is harder to play for 50 people. 50,000 people have a singular persona, not so with 50. Each person has an individual, separate identity, a world unto themselves. They can perceive things more clearly. Your honesty and how it relates to the depth of your talent is tried. The fact that the Nobel committee is so small is not lost on me.
But, like Shakespeare, I too am often occupied with the pursuit of my creative endeavors and dealing with all aspects of life’s mundane matters. “Who are the best musicians for these songs?” “Am I recording in the right studio?” “Is this song in the right key?” Some things never change, even in 400 years.
Not once have I ever had the time to ask myself, “Are my songs literature?”
So, I do thank the Swedish Academy, both for taking the time to consider that very question, and, ultimately, for providing such a wonderful answer.
My best wishes to you all,
Bob Dylan

1:44 AM  
Anonymous Horace EngdahlNoble Speech part 1 said...

Här är Horace Engdahls tal i sin helhet: Part 1

Hur sker de stora omvälvningarna i litteraturens värld? Ofta genom att någon tar en enkel och ringaktad form, som ännu inte räknas till ordkonsten i högre mening, och får den att mutera. Så blev den moderna romanen till en gång ur anekdoten och brevet, så föddes den nya tidens drama ur upptåg på brädor lagda över tunnor på någon marknadsplats, så detroniserade visor på folkspråket den lärda latinska poesin, så tog La Fontaine djurfabeln och H C Andersen sagan från barnkammaren till parnassens höjd. Varje gång någonting sådant sker förändras idén om vad litteraturen är.

I och för sig borde det inte vara sensationellt att en sångare och låtskrivare står som mottagare av det litterära Nobelpriset. I ett avlägset förflutet var all poesi sjungen eller klangfullt reciterad, poeterna var rapsoder, barder, trubadurer, lyrik kommer av lyra. Men det Bob Dylan gjorde var inte att återvända till grekerna eller provensalerna. I stället försvor han sig med kropp och själ åt 1900-talets amerikanska populärmusik, det som spelades på radiostationer och grammofonskivor för vanligt folk, vita och svarta: kampsånger, country, blues, tidig rock, gospel, underhållningsmusik.

Han lyssnade dag och natt, prövade på sina instrument, försökte göra efter. Men när han skulle skriva likadana sånger blev de annorlunda. I hans händer förvandlades materian. Det han hittade av grannlåt och bråte, av banala rim och smarta fraser, av förbannelser och fromma böner, kärleksviskningar och råa skämt, allt detta renade han till poetiskt guld, om avsiktligt eller oavsiktligt, det är inte en relevant fråga, allt skapande börjar med ansträngningen att härma.

2:36 AM  
Anonymous Horace EngdahlNoble Speech part 2 said...


Inte ens efter femtio års oavbruten exponering har vi kunnat vänja oss vid denna musikens motsvarighet till sagans Flygande holländare. Han rimmar bra, sa en kritiker som förklaring till hans storhet. Och det är sant. Hans rimmande är ett alkemiskt medel som upplöser alla sammanhang och skapar nya, som bara nätt och jämnt får plats i den mänskliga hjärnan.

Det var en chock. Där publiken väntade poppiga folksånger stod en ung man med gitarr som fick gatans språk och Bibelns att ingå en förening efter vilken världens undergång skulle ha känts som en överflödig repris. Samtidigt sjöng han om kärlek med en övertalningskraft som alla önskar att de ägde. Med ens tedde sig mycket av den bokliga poesin på jorden egendomligt bleksiktig, och de vanliga sångtexterna, de som kollegerna fortsatte att skriva, liknade på något vis gammalt svartkrut efter uppfinnandet av dynamiten. Snart slutade man jämföra honom med Woody Guthrie och Hank Williams och fick i stället ta till Blake, Rimbaud, Whitman, Shakespeare.

På den mest osannolika platsen av alla, den kommersiella grammofonskivan, återskänkte han det poetiska språket den höga stilen, som hade varit förlorad sedan romantikerna. Men inte för att sjunga om evigheten, utan för att tala om det som händer runt omkring oss. Det var som om oraklet i Delfi läste upp kvällsnyheterna.

Att erkänna denna revolution genom att tilldela Bob Dylan Nobelpriset var ett beslut som tycktes djärvt bara innan det var fattat och som redan verkar självklart. Men ger vi honom priset för att han rumsterat om i litteraturens system? Nej, egentligen inte. Det finns en enklare förklaring, som vi delar med alla dem som står med klappande hjärta framför scenen vid någon anhalt på hans oändliga turné och väntar på den magiska rösten.

Chamfort gjorde iakttagelsen att när en mästare som La Fontaine framträder spelar genrernas hierarki, uppfattningen om vad som är stort och smått, högt och lågt i litteraturen, ingen roll. ”Vad betyder det av vilken ordning verken är, när deras skönhet är av första ordningen?” skriver han. Det är det enkla svaret på frågan om hur Bob ­Dylan kommer in i litteraturen: ­genom att skönheten hos hans sånger är av första ordningen.

Med sitt verk har Bob Dylan förändrat uppfattningen om vad poesi kan vara och hur den kan verka. Han är en ­sångare värdig att stå vid sidan av grekernas ἀοιδόι, bredvid Ovidius, bredvid de romantiska visionärerna, bredvid bluesens kungar och drottningar, bredvid geniala standardsångers bortglömda mästare. Om folk i den litterära världen knorrar, får man påminna dem om att gudarna inte skriver, de dansar och de sjunger. Svenska Akademiens välgångsönskningar följer mr Dylan på hans väg till kommande spelplatser.

2:40 AM  
Blogger Pari Nidhi said...

Uncertainty stares at tens of thousands of CBSE Class 12 students across the state as the results are expected only on May 27 or 28, after an unusually long gap of 20 days since the state board results were announced. http://CbseResults.Nic.in, cbseresults.nic.in, www.cbseresults.nic.in

4:28 PM  

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home